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20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
's not that we've created it; we're taking advantage of the demand. narrator: and as demand increases, john pihl is feeling closed in. pihl: we see pressure every dayhe. we have housing, residential housing slated for right up to our fence line right next to the farm. narrator: john knows farmers in the county who have sold for as much as $20,000 an acre. an offer like that could bring in $10 million for this 500-acre farm. since he now earns about $40,000 a year, e essureo sellisuildg. but for now, his concerns are holding him back. pihl: i think probably what we're mosconcerned about is thaingsre cingincrediblyast, ani hate to segs, good things get lost narrator: whether or not john continues to stay on this land, others will not resist the temptation to sell. farming is fast becoming a thing of the past in chicago's edge communities, and though local zoning regulations can moderate the eff of gwth, as the search so does development's steady push down the interstate. in north america automobiles and highways have come to dominate the landscape of human settlement. along the way, they have led
it seems equal? >> that's the question i had too, yes. >> well john is right, it is a patriarchal society has evolved that way and may be in a sense - confucianism, as it became institutionalized in the hong dynasty about 2,000 years ago, long after confucius by the way, but they set up these rules to basically one can say, reinforce a patriarchal system. but, in essence the yin yang relationship is not just sort of male/female and dominant/recessive, it is more dynamic than that. it's more like the light on the mountain, and the light in the morning, and the light in the evening, that you can't have one without the other. that each depends on the other for its very existence. that's that interdependence sort of aspect here that the dot on the other side that, high and low, light and dark, life and death. you can't have life as we know it without the concept of death. in fact, this harmonization of opposites is i think an opening to looking at male/female relationships in a positive way. not just statically saying one is above and the other is below, but to say that we're constantly doing
more in taxes. >> house speaker john boehner argued against any tax rises -- tax hikes. >> instead of raising taxes on americans, let's begin to solve the problems. let's focus on tax reform, closing the loopholes and tax rates. instead of an arbitrary cuts that will endanger our defense, but consumers about entitling -- short of the entitlement programs. >> in haiti, turn to rains and floods have killed 11 people and left thousands homeless. just two weeks after he was devastated by hurricane sandy, rivers have overflowed, crops have been destroyed, and aid workers say they are in dire need of supplies. >> we have 150 people here with only 12 sacks of bread. they gave us four cases of jews this morning. the world food program brought two packs of cookies for each one. we have handicapped people here, women who give birth last night. we have nothing for them. >> and the york region is continuing its slow recovery, retain sunday -- slow recovery from hurricane sandy. officials say the storm caused more than $50 billion in damages to the new york region, making it the country's costl
crimen, no hay justicia. >> the 16th-century metaphysical poet john donne said, "no man is an island, entire of itself." in fact, as social beings, we are connected. but beyond that...virtually everything we experience -- in nature as well as human activity -- involves a series of connections that link one thing to another. networks, you might say, make the world go round. [ indistinct chattering ] meet raymond price: media tycoon, power broker, and center of attention. this is his party, his network. enter joe smith. he's just crashed the social event of the year and apparently doesn't know a soul. but this is one network joe would like to join. now, if he could only get connected. >> nice party. >> mr. price knows how to entertain. >> you know raymond price? >> no. i'm too low on that totem pole. apparently, even my date thinks so. >> does he know... >> i don't know. but i'm sure he knows somebody who knows somebody who -- well, you know what i mean. >> and he left you just hanging here? >> disconnected. >> joe's working the social network for an introduction. but this is just one
, explorer john lloyd stephens wrote, "standing as they do "in the depth of a tropical forest, "silent and solemn, "their whole history so entirely unknown..." "with hieroglyphics explaining all, "but perfectly unintelligible. "who shall read them ?" could anyone read these odd markings ? for more than a century, they tried. but the story of the maya people, if these glyphs could reveal it, remained locked in stone. had the maya recorded their history ? many ancient people who used writing did not. in fact, writing was first used for a very different purpose. around 8000 b.c., the world's earliest farmers had settled in mesopotamia, a region of the middle east that includes iraq and iran. in their hands, desert became rich farmland, as iigation agriculture was born. the people bartered for goods and paid taxes. record-keeping was begun, with goods represented by abstract tokens. these led to writing, according to denise schmandt-besserat, professor of mid-eastern studies. schmandt-besserat: each of these shapes was meaningful. the cone probably stood for a unit of grain, a small unit o
/mother, and yin and yang it seems equal? >> that's the question i had too, yes. >> well john is right, it is a patriarchal society has evolved that way and may be in a sense - confucianism, as it became institutionalized in the hong dynasty about 2,000 years ago, long after confucius by the way, but they set up these rules to basically one can say, reinforce a patriarchal system. but, in essence the yin yang relationship is not just sort of male/female and dominant/recessive, it is more dynamic than that. it's more like the light on the mountain, and the light in the morning, and the light in the evening, that you can't have one without the other. that each depends on the other for its very existence. that's that interdependence sort of aspect here that the dot on the other side that, high and low, light and dark, life and death. you can't have life as we know it without the concept of death. in fact, this harmonization of opposites is i think an opening to looking at male/female relationships in a positive way. not just statically saying one is above and the other is below, but to sa
not venture? amongst several of my interests here at johns hopkins has been a concern that doctors are accepting both "do not resuscitate" orders and a willingness to think about killing patients in a fashion that we think is a slippery slope to killing more patients, to ignoring the value that sick patients still have to themselves and the world, and ultimately to the coarsening of the character of the doctors who think in that way. alex capron: like anything, we're always dealing with a swinging pendulum, and in some cases, we probably go too far. and there's always a risk that while many of the older doctors today had to be schooled out of the "do everything" view, some of the youngest doctors coming along who've never experienced that probably are too much in the other direction. but... i don't know if the pendulum will ever come to rest right in the middle. we're always dealing with a social movement, as it were, of which medicine is a part. some people believe th the ideof patient self-determination should be extended a step further: the step of saying the patient should not
or to their sweet floral scent. they can offer so much more. just ask john clemons, a flower farmer for more than 20 years now. you can step onto his farm in the town of jamul and think it looks similar to the other dozens of flower farms in san diego county. but look a little closer, and you'll discover a sweet surprise. >> in the mid-nineties, i was lookin' through a book, came across a recipe for crystallized violets, and i thought, hmm. egg whites, dip the flower in. throw it in sugar. roll it around. put it down. it dries, and you have something crunchy that's nonperishable. it's completely dried, and it's sugarcoated. i thought, "oh, my god. cold food side. they could use 'em on desserts. i've gotta figure out how to do this." >> imagine your favorite flowers turned into sugary tastes of heaven. that is exactly the idea that john set out to accomplish, to make a sweeter, better-tasting edible flower that he grew himself, the likes of which nobody had seen or heard of before, not even his girlfriend at the time, that is until their first date. >> i brought her a little tray of crystallized viol
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)